Leftist Lexicon Word of the Week

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As we enter into the hardcore holiday season, we get to see some of the signs. Santa Claus appearing in Coke ads. The litany of Christmas favorites on TV. And the latest holiday craze, people getting offended by stupid shit.

Whether it’s “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” being called racist or “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer” not being culturally sensitive to…I’m guessing reindeer without red noses, people are finding more and more ways to get offended by stuff we’ve never considered before because, well, we’re well-adjusted. And, as people get offended, they insist these things get banned or, if they’re on currently, cancelled. This is now known as cancel culture, and it’s well worth taking a look at before someone else gets upset.

cancel culture

What the Left thinks it means – a necessary evil to protect the weakest among us in society

What it really means – wanting to create an a la carte life free from anything that might hurt our fee-fees

Cancel culture has been around in one form or another for a few decades. Once, people who were outraged about an issue not being addressed to their satisfaction would boycott the corporate or public entity not addressing said issue. Sometimes it worked, but more often than not it just annoyed people. Now, the annoying people are the ones doing the protesting, but with a greater degree of success because public and private entities either surrender like a French version of Shaggy from “Scooby Doo” to avoid the PR headaches (or to avoid being driven mad by all the whining) or agree with the protesters. Yes, there are those rare times when the whiners…I mean protesters get turned back by a person or entity with a backbone stiffer than Jello before you put it in the fridge to harden, but these are getting harder to find than a point to the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiries.

As a result of the success mentioned above, free speech and free expression have been taking hits. Traveling comedians now have to be careful with what jokes they tell out of fear of watching their source of income dry up faster than a donation to the Cory Booker Presidential campaign. Actors now have to apologize for casting decisions they did or didn’t have a say in. (On a side note, I’m still waiting for an apology for having to sit through “Twilight: New Moon” because it was a really bad movie.)

But here’s the funny thing. Cancel culture only goes one way. If a Leftist complains about something offensive, the presumed offender bends over backwards like a gay contortionist to make things right (which they can never truly do because Leftists are perpetually offended). If anyone outside of the Leftist bubble complains about something offensive, it’s usually dismissed at being silly or being on “the wrong side of history.” So, if you’re a conservative who sees a gay couple in the Sears catalog, your chances of getting anyone on the Left to take up your causes are as slim as Stacey Abrams’ chances of making sense.

Cancel culture also has a negative impact on freedom of speech and freedom of expression. This is where a lot of people get tripped up by what cancel culture does. Take Twitter, for example. Twitter has a reputation of being hamfisted when it comes to conservative speech, even speech that wouldn’t be seen as offensive, while letting vile and harassing behavior go when it comes from a Leftist. Twitter is a private company and has its own set of rules when it comes to online behavior, so freedom of speech and expression laws don’t apply. However, it does send a message to potential users to either say what the Twitter overlords deem appropriate (which can change on a moment’s notice without any warning) or you will not be allowed a platform.

And when you consider how some platforms are intertwined (I’m looking at you, Google/YouTube), one offense can ripple over several platforms, which means fewer platforms for alternative voices with the global reach of YouTube, effectively silencing these voices. This is where the free speech/free expression issue comes to a head. You aren’t guaranteed a forum under the First Amendment, but when everyone else doesn’t even consider allowing you to use theirs unless you dance to their tune, there really isn’t much free speech or free expression going on.

Of course, this isn’t of any concern to the cancel culture because they want to eliminate anything they don’t agree with by any means necessary. And they know they will most likely get away with it.

But there is a way to defang the cancel culture: act like adults. You can be offended or disagree with a business decision or a celebrity opinion, but it doesn’t give you the authority to delete them from existence. What you can do is acknowledge the way you feel and recognize these folks have the same ability to express themselves that you do. It’s in that give-and-take where the cancel culture can’t hang. They need their binary thinking to flourish, but when presented with an option that doesn’t fall into that binary approach, they don’t know what to do, aside from complaining that is.

If we limit ourselves to only those positions we agree with, we miss out on a lot of great experiences. Personally, I disagree with much of what Samuel L. Jackson believes, but I recognize his talents as an actor and as someone who is an artist when it comes to using the word “motherfucker.” To remove him from my life because of an ideological difference would make me poorer for the experience and no better than cancel culture. I would rather take the chance of being offended to expand my horizons than to protect my feelings and never know what life is like on the other side.

And that’s really what cancel culture is in a nutshell: people who want to steal knowledge from you so they don’t have to engage in anything that might challenge them. And, let’s be honest, they’re challenged enough as it is, if you know what I mean.

Author: Thomas

I'm a small town boy living in the heart of Iowa watching the world go by with my wife and dog.

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