We’re Totally Commit…Oh, Look, a Bunny!

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Bully Hunters, we hardly knew ye.

For about 24 hours, a website claiming to help female gamers in online play who were being harassed was the talk of the Internet. Then, it all came crashing down after it was determined their live stream, statistics, and organization were more fraudulent than a vow of celibacy from Bill Clinton. Or any politician for that matter. This isn’t to downplay online bullying, but it speaks to a much larger issue the Left: the lack of sustainability of their causes.

Remember Occupy Wall Street? Cindy Sheehan? Bradley/Chelsea Manning? If you have a long memory, you do, but what have they really done since their meteoric rise to prominence? Nothing. Wall Street still has a hold of national and global financial matters, Sheehan ran against Nancy Pelosi and lost, and Manning is more of a Twitter celebrity today than a trendsetter. And time and time again, Leftist causes get started, get attention, and then get out of the public eye. Think of them like a sparkler. They start out generating light, heat, and sparks, but eventually they burn out.

Why is that? A lot of it has to do with the nature of Leftist ideology and the personal passions people bring to the cause. To their credit, Leftists have a strong emotional tie to their beliefs. Whether it’s gun control or income inequality, the fire burns just as brightly. The problem, however, is emotions that run high will eventually run low. The fire that burns today may be embers tomorrow. In order to keep the fire burning, you have to keep feeding it.

And this is where the Left continues to stumble. After a hot opening, there isn’t much follow up. And by “isn’t much,” I mean “none at all.” As time moves on, people’s attentions move to other topics. One week, people are marching in the streets. The next, they’re marching to the Apple Store for the newest technological bauble they “have to have” (usually to Tweet about how bad capitalism is). With that switch, Leftist causes lose momentum and become footnotes in the annals of modern society.

We’re starting to see this happening with the gun control movement in the aftermath of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting. You may not notice it from the positive media coverage David Hogg and his pro-gun control teen allies have gotten, but we’re now 2 months removed from the shooting and there hasn’t been much in the form of actual action…except from the camp of one of Hogg’s peers, Kyle Kashuv, who has met with politicians from both sides and helped to promote bipartisan legislation related to school safety. While Hogg and his allies grabbed the spotlight, Kashuv made his mark quietly, and continues to promote a pro Second Amendment message in spite of bullying and harassment by those who say bullying and harassment are wrong.

Irony, table for a few million.

Instead of creating a lasting movement, the Left seems obsessed with creating faces and emotional appeals to give the impression of a larger movement. That’s like putting a megaphone up to an iPod speaker playing Nickelback in the attempt to make people think they’re Led Zeppelin. Granted, there have been worse attempts to make Nickelback as popular as Zep, but that’s neither here nor there. The important concept to take away here is you need to do more than create images and feelings to make a movement.

Where the Right gets this, well, right is in turning passionate activism into passionate action. Take the TEA Party, for example. Although they have been maligned, mocked, and, oh yeah, attacked by the IRS, the TEA Party continues to exist. Maybe with smaller than expected numbers, but they still exist and remain active because its members continue to be motivated to reduce the size and scope of government. And they remain focused on that goal instead of trying to devote energy towards multiple goals. Talk to a Leftist and they can rattle off any number of causes they’re passionate about, but they’re hard pressed to come up with any concrete examples of where those causes have been advanced solely because of those passions.

Get the picture?

Passion without results makes any cause a grind instead of a calling. In some cases, though, it turns a cause into a laughingstock if it creates an environment where dishonesty overrules common sense. Bully Hunters sought to address online bullying by creating the impression it was a larger problem than it actually is and by creating the illusion it was the only option to combat it. And in less than 24 hours, Bully Hunters was exposed as a fraud, which hurts their credibility and the credibility of the cause it championed. You have literally given your critics the ammunition they need to discredit online bullying as an issue going forward.

And all to try to promote gaming headsets.

Good job!