Bible Reading

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On April 26th the Iowa Governor Terry Branstad issued a proclamation. This in itself is not unusual. Anyone can request the Governor to issue a proclamation on anything impacting the entire state. There is even an online web form for this submission.

But this particular proclamation has received a lot of hostile press and feedback. Why you might ask? Because this proclamation calls for reading the Holy Bible.

The proclamation gives a history of how the Holy Bible shaped our nations foundation. And how past Presidents felt and spoke about God’s Word to mankind.

The proclamation gives the testimony of who reading the Holy Bible helps solve the problems we face today as a nation and as individuals.

It also calls for anyone who wishes to participate in reading the Holy Bible with others on the steps of all 99 county court houses from June 30th to July 3rd. And the proclamation encourages all Iowans to read the Holy Bible daily until the second coming of Jesus Christ.

Three anti-Christian groups are considering litigation and have condemned the proclamation. These are the American Civil Liberties Union of Iowa, the Freedom From Religion Foundation, and the Iowa Atheists and Freethinkers.

These groups are siting the so-called belief in the “separation of church and state” as the basis for their litigation and complaints. This is a false belief for various reasons.

The “separation of church and state” is not in the Constitution or in any statute or law of the land. It’s always called up by anti-Christian groups as part of their hate speech against Christianity.

What the Constitution does say in the 1st Amendment about religion is this:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;

This means Congress, the legislative body of the United States, cannot create a law establishing a national church. Like the Tudor Kings did in England with the Church of England. The Queen is still the head of that church. Nor can Congress write a law preventing anyone from worshiping as they choose to do so.

This is the sole basis from those anti-Christian groups against the Governor’s proclamation. And it just doesn’t hold up.

The proclamation is not an act of Congress. It does not carry the weight of law or any legal authority. It is not a law. It is completely voluntary without any obligation being required.

For those who do not wish to be involved with a religion or those that do not believe in the divine. They don’t have to read the Holy Bible at home or anywhere else.

They don’t have to join those who are reading the Holy Bible on the court house steps at the end of June. They can just walk on by and ignore them.

But their goal is to destroy the Christian faith and persecute all who practice it. So these anti-Christian groups will continue their assault anyway.

In issuing this proclamation the Governor hasn’t violated any law or principle of our government. He has merely exorcised his office in conjunction with his faith.

Indiana and Religious Freedom

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All over the news are the reports of the militant LGBT community boycotting the state of Indiana for the recent Religious Freedom statute passed by the state legislature and signed by the governor. What we don’t really hear about is the 18 other states that have similar statutes already on the books. We also don’t hear that it is a fundamental business owners right to refuse service to anyone they don’t want to do business with on any grounds.

In addition to Indiana, the states of Idaho, Arizona, New Mexico, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri, Illinois, Louisiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Florida, and Virginia all have similar statues. Are any of these states being boycotted by the militant LGBT community?

What about the 13 additional states that are proposing similar legislation, are they being boycotted as well?

The answer to both of those questions is already known. The answer of course is no they are not boycotting any of these other states. The fact remains that the militant LGBT community carefully chooses its targets. And Indiana, being a midwest state, like my native Iowa, has the crosshairs on it. This will enter the courts to be decided who may or may not strike the statute down. But that is the risk the militant LGBT community is going to take.

Once it is struck down in Indiana, they will use this as leverage to have it struck down in all other states at the US Supreme Court level. And also take on the Federal Statute that also exists with similar wording. Again no boycotting of the United States going on here.